An estimated 2.7 million people across Somalia are expected to face Crisis or worse (IPC Phase 3 or higher) outcomes between April and June without sustained humanitarian assistance. An additional 2.9 million people are expected to be Stressed (IPC Phase 2), bringing the total number of people facing acute food insecurity to 5.6 million. These numbers are expected to increase further between July and September 2020, when 3.5 million people are expected to face Crisis or worse (IPC Phase 3 or higher) outcomes and an additional 2.9 million people are expected to be Stressed (IPC Phase 2), bringing the total number of people facing acute food insecurity across Somalia to 6.4 million. Areas of highest concern include urban IDP settlements, Riverine Pump and Riverine Gravity, and Guban Pastoral livelihood zones, where it is likely that some of the most vulnerable poor households will deteriorate to Emergency (IPC Phase 4)
Humanitarian assistance must be scaled up through September 2020 to prevent Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes for up to 3.5 million people. Livelihoods support is also required for people that are Stressed or worse (IPC Phase 2 or higher).

SOYDA Quarterly Progressive Report-April-June 2020In Somalia, the median Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) prevalence has remained Serious (10–14.9%) for the past three consecutive seasons (13.1% in 2019/20 Deyr, 13.8% in 2019 Gu and 12.6 % in 2018/19 Deyr). The median prevalence of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) has also remained Alert (1.1-2.4%) over the past three consecutive seasons (1.8% in 2019/20 Deyr, 2.3% in 2019 Gu and 1.9% in 2018/19 Deyr). High levels of acute malnutrition tend to persist across Somalia due to several factors, including high morbidity, low immunization and Vitamin-A supplementation, poor care practices and acute food insecurity.

Data from obtained from the Somalia Nutrition Cluster indicates a 13 percent increase in monthly new admissions of acutely malnourished children between January and March 2020 compared to the first-quarter average monthly admission for 2016-2019. This can be attributed to sporadic disease outbreaks (acute watery diarrhea- AWD/cholera and measles outbreak), and worsening of the food security situation in many areas.
According to data obtained from the Somalia Health Cluster and WHO, there has been a 7 percent decrease in reported measles cases across Somalia compared to the first-quarter average for 2016-2019 but 71 percent increase compared to the first quarter of 2019 (Figure 11). Measles cases are expected to increase during the second quarter (April-June 2020) and last quarter (October-December 2020) based trends observed on historical data. The largest measles outbreaks (≥70 cases) were reported during the first quarter of 2020 in Baydhaba/Bay (81 cases), Cadaado/Galgadud (213 cases), Jilib/Middle Juba (152 cases), Saakow/Middle Juba (73 cases), Kismaayo/Lower Juba (73 cases) and Mogadishu/Banadir (909 cases).
The socio-economic and healthcare impact of COVID-19 is likely to lead to worsening nutrition outcomes among vulnerable groups, including poor households in urban areas and among Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) who live in crowded, unhygienic conditions and makeshifts shelters in urban areas in the context of declining employment and income earning opportunities and rising food prices.
However, SOYDA have been providing integrated package of nutrition, Food Security, Education, Civic Education, Youth empowerment, WASH, protection, and health intervention in Benadir, Southwest and Jubbaland State of Somalia.

SOYDA shall however, continue its program implementation to enable reduce the vulnerability as well as provide improved lifesaving Health, Nutrition, WASH, Food Security, Protection and Education services
SOYDA Quarterly Progressive Report-April-June 2020